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THE NAMING OF WHITEMAN'S

CREEK

 

 

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An abandoned main branch of the original Whiteman’s Creek. When grist milling operations began in the mid-1800’ in the Burford area the meanders of the original creek were cut off and the creek straightened to speed the flow of water to the mills. This original portion is the portion Governor Simcoe would have seen during his trip here in 1793.

Photo by C. Barker, 2008

 

      Over 200 years ago, actually the British Land Surveyors were confused at the extent of this creek and therefore referred to it by several names such as "Salt Lick Creek" and “Brant’s Creek,” however these names were more properly associated with the two main branches of this creek such as Horner’s (Brant’s Creek) and Kenny Creek (Salt Lick Creek). Kenny Creek resembled a Salt Lick to the English, and Horner Creek was labelled “Brant’s Creek” for reasons unknown, on Augustus Jones’ 1793 survey of Burford Township. However, one reason they were confused was because actually three branches of creeks come together: Horner, Kenny and what is now the Elliott Drain to form one creek actually emptying into the Grand, known as Whiteman’s Creek. Eventually after all of the land was surveyed, each branch was properly named and the main branch named “Whiteman’s.”

 

Many residents of Burford and area think that the creek was named after a "white" settler or someone by the name of “Whitman,” However, the early "white" settlers and First Nations native peoples had at least three or four variations of a legend which had been told...

 

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